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DocSIG http://docsig.org American Marketing Association's Special Interest Group for Marketing Doctoral Students Tue, 26 Jul 2016 21:28:02 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.7.2 Call for Applications: Dr. Mathew Joseph Emerging Scholar Award http://docsig.org/call-for-applications-dr-mathew-joseph-emerging-scholar-award/ Tue, 12 Apr 2016 15:16:25 +0000 http://docsig.org/?p=726 Mathew Joseph Emerging Scholar Award

The American Marketing Association’s Doctoral Student Special Interest Group (DocSIG) welcomes applications for the Matthew Joseph Emerging Scholar Award. This award honors a doctoral student scholar who displays exemplary scholarship and a bright future in the marketing discipline. Nominees (self-nominees welcomed) must meet the following criteria:

  • Be a doctoral student or candidate in marketing in good standing at an AACSB university.
  • Demonstrated research productivity (e.g., presented a conference paper, published a peer-reviewed paper). Doing such at an AMA conference or journal is plus.
  • Be a member of the American Marketing Association (AMA) at the time of application.

Applications must be in one pdf document including:

  1. Cover letter as to why the nominee would be an ideal recipient of the emerging scholar award, including a statement regarding his/her personal research stream.
  2. Current curriculum vitae (including a record of publications).
  3. (Self-nominees only): One signed recommendation letter from your dissertation chair or a tenured faculty to attest to the nominee’s research impact and contribution to scholarship.

All applications will be evaluated by a panel of three (3) marketing scholar judges and must be received by Tuesday, May 31, 2016 at 5:00 PM EST. To apply, please email one pdf document to docsig@ama.org.

Please contact Brian Taillon (btaillon@nmsu.edu) or Matthew Lunde (mlunde2@uwyo.edu) with any questions.

The winner will receive a plaque and award of $250 at the 2016 AMA Summer Educators’ Conference. In addition, the winner will also receive complimentary registration to the conference.  The winner will be notified by early July and must be present at the conference in order to receive the award.

We look forward to your application!

Brian Taillon, Chair, DocSIG

Matthew Lunde, Chair-Elect, DocSIG

 

Call for Applications: 2016 Mathew Joseph Award Description

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Take the 2016 Who Went Where? Survey http://docsig.org/take-the-2016-who-went-where-survey/ Tue, 12 Apr 2016 15:11:31 +0000 http://docsig.org/?p=724 Doctoral candidates and graduates in the marketing discipline who were on the job market during the AMA 2015 Summer Marketing Educators Conference in Chicago are asked to fill out the annual AMA DocSIG Who Went Where? Survey

It is time to take the Annual Who Went Where survey!  This survey is for all recently hired doctoral candidates and graduates. For over ten years, this survey has provided marketing doctoral programs and students with a snapshot of the job market. The results from this survey will be presented at the American Marketing Association 2016 Summer Marketing Educators Conference in Atlanta.

Responses are confidential and results are reported only in aggregate. Sharing your name and placement with us is left to your discretion and is not required to complete the survey. Please click on the following link to participate:

 

https://kent.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_9vFUyI72sAiWgm1

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I am Convinced, Statistics are Fun: Doctoral Student Tips & Tools http://docsig.org/blogpost01/ Mon, 01 Feb 2016 10:30:29 +0000 http://docsig.org/?p=709 By Jim Blair

Looking back on my graduate school experience I am amazed at how many statistics courses and new methodologies I have learned in such a short time span. Our discipline is constantly evolving as a science with paradigm shifts, new theories, high tech measurement instruments, innovative sampling techniques, and advanced statistical analyses helping us as researchers move the discipline forward to better understand marketing and consumer behavior.

It is imperative to have a good understanding of research methods and statistical analyses, but statistics can sometimes come off as overwhelming, complicated, or scare people who consider themselves “not a numbers person.” Well, do not worry. Statistics do not have to be scary. During my time as a doctoral student I have learned to embrace them. Statistics can be fun and exciting when you are able to uncover new information and further our discipline’s understanding. Below are some helpful tips and resources for those of you starting out on your academic journey.

  1. Simplify Your Understanding

One of my professors, Dr. Lisa Harlow, stressed the importance of being able to explain a statistical method in simple terms. I found this helpful in better understanding the fundamentals of the analyses and building on my understanding. For example, in simple terms a regression is a statistical analysis used to make some type of prediction and an ANOVA is trying to see if there are significant differences between groups.

There are many helpful texts and resources available. I found Dr. Harlow’s “The Essence of Multivariate Thinking: Basic Themes and Methods” to be helpful in my understanding of several different multivariate analyses and learning how to use structural equation modeling. “Discovering Statistics Using IBM SPSS” by Andy Fields is another resource doctoral students have recommended. Reach out to your advisor or personal mentor; they may have recommendations for texts which help explain statistical methods in layman terms.

  1. Teach/Explain to Others

Having group discussions about class content can be helpful in better understanding materials. During my first semester, I met with a group of my peers to discuss content covered in our univariate statistics class. If you ask around, many of your peers will be interested in meeting to discuss course content. I found it to be a comfortable place to ask questions and share ideas.

Additionally, if you get an opportunity to lead a marketing research review session or teach a course, do it. By preparing the material, creating activities, and explaining the content to others, you will help further your understanding of the research concepts and statistical analyses. I am very thankful Dr. Kay Lemon and Dr. Barb Bickart gave me the opportunity to teach marketing research and learn how to explain complex content in simple terms.

  1. Ask Questions

If something is unclear or you are struggling in class, ask a question. Some courses may have a teaching assistant who is also a graduate student. I found it to be less intimidating asking the TA questions. Use them as a resource to clarify any questions you have. Sometimes the TA has previously gone through the course, so they will have a good idea of what you are going through. My statistics TA, Leslie Brick, did a great job helping out by answering questions, assisting with the statistics software, and explaining how to write up an academic results section. Likely the TA for your statistics course will be eager to help in any of these areas and want to see you succeed in mastering the material covered over the course of the semester to help with your future research projects.

Fellow PhD students are another great resource to utilize. Third and fourth year students in your program are available for questions. They can give you real examples of when you would want to use statistical tests based on their past research experiences and projects. Make sure to return the favor when you get to that point in your graduate school career.

  1. Online Videos

Searching online you can find some helpful videos explaining how to do different statistical analyses in various software programs. I am one who embraces learning by doing, so I follow along with the video actually doing the analyses. Here are two websites I have previously used (http://www.statisticslectures.com/ and http://thedoctoraljourney.com/) with some free resources and videos to help you use statistical software programs, interpret results, and write up an academic study results section.

  1. MOOC

MOOCs stand for Massive Open Online Classes and are a great resource for someone to simply log-in and start taking a course in an area of interest. There are several MOOC sites. I have previously used Coursera (https://www.coursera.org/) and found it to be a successful option with dozens of statistics courses to choose from. They often have good resources posted on the course site to reference and there is no penalty for not completing the course, so you can get just what you want out of it.

  1. Software

There are lots of statistical programs out there (R, SAS, SPSS, Mplus, Amos, LISREL, Stata, JMP, and many more). In our discipline a common software program we use is SPSS. If you are not familiar with it, this would be a good program to purchase and gain some fundamental knowledge with prior to the start of your PhD program. Learning some of the basic functions (inputting data, descriptive statistics, and t-tests) are good to know prior to starting your graduate program.

If you are looking for a free software program, R is available online. If you decide to use R, I would recommend using R Studio. It is also free and has a more user friendly interface. You can access R at https://www.r-project.org/.

  1. Marketing Journals

Look at the articles in some of our discipline’s top journals (Journal of Marketing, Journal of Marketing Research, Journal of Consumer Research, and Marketing Science). Skip to the methodology section of the articles and see what statistical analyses these researchers are using. Since many of us strive to publish in these top-tier journals it is good to understand popular research methods and practices currently being used.

  1. Expand Your Horizons

Do not be afraid to learn new statistical methods you may be unfamiliar with. During our PhD process, this is our opportunity to add more statistical “tools” to our researcher “tool-belt.” If you have the freedom to take elective courses in your program consider adding some methodological classes to your schedule. At this stage you do not want to restrict yourself to limited types of research. For example, by claiming you are an “experimental researcher” you may be limiting yourself to only experimental designs. You may be less likely to learn more complex statistical analyses or could miss out on techniques to use for secondary data. Keep an open-mind and learn as many research methods as possible. You may need them later in your research career.

In addition to taking courses within your department, other departments at your university may have helpful courses for your research development. I often found helpful courses in the statistics and psychology departments at my institution. Sometimes your school, doctoral consortiums, or conferences you attend offer helpful workshops or sessions on different research methods. Those can be great opportunities to learn and also network with other professionals in the room.

  1. Make Statistics Relevant to You

As PhD students we can use statistics to help us better examine the phenomena we are studying. Whenever you are learning about new statistics, apply them to research you are interested in or currently conducting. As a result, these tools will become more useful to you and help in the learning process.

  1. Share Your Resources

Share your resources with others. As you advance through your doctoral programs give back by helping out some of the newer PhD students by answering questions, giving examples, and providing materials which you found helpful in your learning process. By sharing information and content with our marketing community as a whole, we can help advance our discipline by making our learning process more efficient and expanding the number of research methods available.

Conclusion

Going into the first statistics class of my PhD program I was intimidated and nervous. We covered some statistical analyses in my undergraduate studies and MBA program, but I knew this would be different. Looking through the course syllabus for the first time, I saw I would be learning to use a new software program and several new statistical techniques. I am very thankful for my study group, course teaching assistant, and the fellow PhD students in my program during the first semester. Talking through some of the statistical methods and concepts with these individuals helped further my understanding and apply the course material to my research interests. The online resources I had mentioned were also helpful supplements in furthering my understanding of the statistics concepts covered. By the end of the semester, I was more confident and looking forward to my upcoming statistics courses.

Hopefully these tips give you some good resources moving forward and make you more comfortable using statistics in your research. Remember, statistics do not have to be scary; embrace them and use them to your advantage. If you were one of those people who said, “I am not a numbers person,” give these tips a try and I hope by the end of your PhD journey you are able to say “statistics are fun.”

Author Bio

James-Blair

Jim Blair is a third year marketing PhD student at the University of Rhode Island. His research interests are in consumer behavior and pricing with previous research in the sport industry. Feel free to email him with any questions at blairj4@my.uri.edu or follow him on Twitter @MrMarketingPhD.

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2015 Who Went Where Survey Results Are In! http://docsig.org/2015-who-went-where-survey-results-are-in/ Mon, 24 Aug 2015 16:18:30 +0000 http://docsig.org/?p=659 2015_Who_Went_Where_BannerDocSIG is pleased to announce publication of the 2015 Who Went Where Survey results, which reflect responses from marketing doctoral candidates on the job market between summer 2014 and early 2015. Credit goes to Paul Mills and Jamie Grigsby at Kent State University for executing this year’s data collection, analysis, and reporting.

Highlights from the Report:

  • The number of respondents whose research focus is modeling increased by 10% from last year to 28% of all respondents.
  • Modelers’ average total salaries fell from $173,209 to $159,410. This made the gap between modelers and the other areas of focus (CB: $149,680; Strategy: $138,933) the smallest it has been since we started collecting data in 2003.
  • Average salaries, regardless of research focus, are the highest they have been at an average 9-month salary of $130,092 and an average total salary of $147,430.
  • 21% of respondents reported having at least 1 A-level publication, and nearly 50% reported having at least one B-level or lower publication. While the average number of B-level or lower publications per respondent fell slightly, the average number of A-level publications per respondent is the highest it has ever been.

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Also, be sure to check out Jamie Grigsby’s Summer AMA presentation about this year’s Who Went Where survey and check out the historical archive of Who Went Where reports.

Any comments or questions can be directed to docsig@ama.org.

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2015 Summer AMA DocSIG Events http://docsig.org/2015-summer-ama-docsig-events/ Sat, 08 Aug 2015 14:08:56 +0000 http://docsig.org/?p=646 The American Marketing Association’s Doctoral Student Special Interest Group (DocSIG) is pleased to announce several exciting and free events just for doctoral students at Summer AMA in Chicago!  Below is a list of events we have scheduled for Friday, August 14th.  Tickets for each event are limited, so please be sure to RSVP early before seats run out!  Each event is free to attend thanks to the financial support of the American Marketing Association and our generous partners!  You will need to register for each event separately by following the links to our Eventbrite pages. Please register only for events you plan to attend. You should cancel your registration if you know you will not be able to attend, so other students have an opportunity.

 

Summer AMA DocSIG Breakfast and Dr. Mathew Joseph Scholarship Award Presentation:
Come and network with fellow doctoral students at breakfast on Friday, August 14th from 8:00 A.M. to 9:00 A.M. in Room Missouri. This year, we will present the Dr. Mathew Joseph Scholarship Award during the breakfast.  Registration is free and easy, but is required and must be done through Eventbrite so capacity can be managed.

  Register Now on Eventbrite

 

DocSIG and PhD Project Lunch and Who Went Where Survey Results:

We have partnered again this year with the PhD Project to provide you with a free lunch and a seat for the first presentation of the DocSIG’s Who Went Where Survey Results on Friday, August 14 from 12:00-1:30 P.M. Also, Dr. Jagdish Sheth will deliver the Academic Keynote Address at this luncheon.  Again, seats are limited for this free event, so please register on our Eventbrite page by following the link below.

 Register Now on Eventbrite

 

DocSIG/Higher Ed SIG Dinner Social:

This free dinner sponsored by DocSIG and Higher Ed SIG will be hosted at Volare Italian Restaurant, 201 E. Grand Ave from 7:00 P.M. to 9:00 P.M. on Friday, August 14th.  We will meet in the lobby of the Sheraton at 6:30 P.M. to walk to the restaurant together (approximately 10 minute walk).  Each attendee will be able to spend up to $25.00 on dinner to be paid for by DocSIG and Higher Ed SIG.  Seats are limited, so please follow the Eventbrite link below to register for this event!

Register Now on Eventbrite

 

Other Opportunities:

DocSIG Special Session:

DocSIG has organized a special session “Hiring in Marketing Academia: A Look Behind Closed Doors,” where we’ll have research and panelists addressing hiring from the perspective of the institutions, plus the newest Who Went Where survey presentation. The session will take place Saturday, August 15 at 8:00 A.M. in Room Erie.

 

Stukent Pre-Conference Internet Marketing Bootcamp 50% Discount

The bootcamp features a half day of training on how to teach internet marketing and will be taught by leading faculty experts on Friday, August 14 from 7:30-12 at the Sheraton hotel. If you are interested in attending, the discount price for DocSIG members is $50 with the promotional code “DOCSIG50.” More information and registration.

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2015 Mathew Joseph Emerging Scholar Award Winner http://docsig.org/2015-mathew-joseph-emerging-scholar-award-winner/ Sun, 19 Jul 2015 12:30:49 +0000 http://docsig.org/?p=634 Niket JindalDocSIG is pleased to announce that Niket Jindal, University of Texas at Austin, has been awarded the 2015 Mathew Joseph Emerging Scholar Award. The award, sponsored by Dr. Mathew Joseph, honors a doctoral student who has displayed exemplary scholarship and exhibits a bright future in the academic discipline.

“Thank you to the American Marketing Association for this recognition, to Mathew Joseph for his generosity, and to the many members of the marketing academic community who have supported my research – particularly Leigh McAlister, my advisor at the University of Texas,” said Jindal.

The faculty judges also wished to acknowledge several other promising students as honorable mentions for the award:

Mitchell Olsen, Indiana University
Valeria Stourm, University of Pennsylvania
Jacob Suher, University of Texas at Austin

Three marketing scholar judges evaluated all of the candidate submissions. The award funding and plaque will be presented at the Summer Educators’ Conference in Chicago.

“The level of scholarship being produced by some of these students is simply unreal,” says Scott Cowley, DocSIG Chair. “Their dedication and productivity should serve as a shining beacon to current and many future students in our discipline. I have an immense amount of respect for the sacrifices made by our winners in reaching these heights.”

Please stay tuned to the DocSIG blog, Facebook, and Twitter for details on how to apply for the Mathew Joseph Emerging Scholar Award. Congratulations to the winners!

Mathew Joseph, Niket Jindal, Scott Cowley, Jacob Suher - DocSIG Award

(L-R): Dr. Mathew Joseph, Niket Jindal, Scott Cowley, Jacob Suher

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Take the 2015 Who Went Where? Survey http://docsig.org/www2015/ Fri, 01 May 2015 02:40:54 +0000 http://docsig.org/?p=628 Doctoral candidates and graduates in the marketing discipline who were on the job market during the AMA 2014 Summer Marketing Educators Conference in San Francisco are asked to fill out the annual AMA DocSIG Who Went Where? Survey

It is time to take the Annual Who Went Where survey!  This survey is for all recently hired doctoral candidates and graduates. For over ten years, this survey has provided marketing doctoral programs and students with a snapshot of the job market. The results from this survey will be presented at the American Marketing Association 2015 Summer Marketing Educators Conference in Chicago.

Responses are confidential and results are reported only in aggregate. Sharing your name and placement with us is left to your discretion and is not required to complete the survey. Please click on the following link to participate:

https://qtrial2014.az1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_5BzHR34RLfEMyTr

Thank you in advance for your participation.  Questions about the Who Went Where? survey can be directed to Paul Mills, Vice-Chair of Research, DocSIG at pmills7@kent.edu

Previous years’ results can be found at www.docsig.org.

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MMA Doc Student Teaching Consortium, Outstanding Doc Student Competition Submission Deadline May 22, 2015 http://docsig.org/mma-doc-student-teaching-consortium-outstanding-doc-student-competition-submission-deadline-may-22-2015/ Thu, 05 Mar 2015 04:33:11 +0000 http://docsig.org/?p=607 The uSamp Outstanding Teacher-Scholar Doctoral Student Competition  is held concurrently with the Marketing Management Association Fall Educators’ Conference September 16-18, 2015 in San Juan, Puerto Rico. This conference focuses on research and new developments in teaching marketing – a great fit for those interested in developing teaching skills as part of a complete candidate package. The consortium also provides individual training to develop your teaching.
The student conference registration fee is $90 and includes lunch and dinner onThursday as well as lunch on Friday. See full conference details at mmaglobal.org, select Fall Educators’ Conference from the Conferences tab.
Also consider submitting for the uSamp Outstanding Teacher-Scholar Doctoral Student Competition – winner receives a $1,000 cash prize as well as up to two free nights at the conference hotel and conference registration fee paid.
The deadline to apply for the consortium and the competition is May 22, 2015 although the consortium will close once capacity is reached.
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Announcing the AMA Transitions Guide for Job Market Prep http://docsig.org/announcing-the-ama-transitions-guide/ Wed, 11 Feb 2015 21:15:54 +0000 http://docsig.org/?p=602 AMA_Transitions_GuideDocSIG is pleased to announce a brand new publication in collaboration with the American Marketing Association and 21 great marketing scholars.

AMA Transitions Guide: Navigating the Progression from Doctoral Student to Marketing Professor is a resource designed to provide an overview of the traditional job preparation and placement process in marketing. It includes codified standard practices (and best practices) that address areas such as:

  • Job search
  • C.V. and packet organization
  • Summer AMA interviews
  • Fly-outs and research presentations
  • Negotiating offers
  • Preparing for success as a new faculty member

We encourage students and departments to take advantage of this new resource. We also extend our sincere thanks to Lynn Brown-Reyes at the American Marketing Association, editors, designers, DocSIG officers, and the faculty who contributed their experience and expertise toward the compilation of this guide:

Ali Besharat, University of Denver
Laurel Cook, West Virginia University
Andrea Dixon, Baylor University
Dave Hardisty, University of British Columbia
Conor Henderson, University of Oregon
Ronald Hill, Villanova University
Mark Houston, Texas Christian University
Ginger Killian, University of Central Missouri
Son Lam, University of Georgia
Cait Lamberton, University of Pittsburgh
Kristy McManus, University of Wisconsin-LaCrosse
Dave Norton, University of Connecticut
Ethan Pew, Stonybrook University
Teresa Preston, University of Arkansas
Jessica Rixom, Florida International University
Jim Salas, Pepperdine University
Robin Soster, University of Arkansas
Clay Voorhees, Michigan State University
Jeremy Wolter, Auburn University
Marie Yeh, Loyola Maryland University
César Zamudio, Kent State University

Hard copies of the guide will be available at the AMA Winter Educators’ Conference in San Antonio and at subsequent AMA conferences.

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It’s Been a Great Couple of Years http://docsig.org/its-been-a-great-couple-of-years/ Thu, 28 Aug 2014 17:35:11 +0000 http://docsig.org/?p=550 When I applied to be a part of the DocSIG Executive Board two years ago, I had no idea how positively it would impact my life. Over the past couple of years, DocSIG has planned and implemented a variety of well-attended conference programs, including pre-conference symposia, networking breakfasts, special sessions, and dinner socials. We have also significantly increased our online presence, completely revamping our website, and growing our Facebook and Twitter engagement by leaps and bounds. I’ve had tremendous experiences as Chair Elect and as Chair, much due to the wonderful people I’ve had the privilege to meet and work with along the way.

To my fellow board members over the past couple of years – Scott Cowley, Hillary Mellema, Christopher Ling, Robert Allen King, Keith Smith, Ryan Langan, Rebecca Dingus, Paul Mills, Liwu Hsu, Lei Song, Stephen Hampton, and Aaron Gleiberman – thank you for all of your hard work; it was a true pleasure to work with each of you. Special thanks to Kimberly Whitler for her mentorship along the way, to Jennifer Martinez Hutchins for initially encouraging me to apply for what ended up being an incredibly rewarding experience, and to the AMA staff, especially Matt Weingarden, Bill Stanton, and Lynn Reyes-Brown, who have been so helpful and such a pleasure to work with. Thank you to the many faculty members who supported our programs as mentors; your participation and insights offered great value to our attendees. Finally, thank you to the marketing doctoral student community for supporting our conference programming, networking opportunities, and online resources; DocSIG would not be possible without your continued support.

As DocSIG transitions to new leadership, with Scott Cowley as the new Chair and Brian Taillon as the new Chair Elect on September 1, 2014, I look forward to its continued success and growth. DocSIG is a unique organization that offers great opportunities to the marketing academic community, and I’m very proud to have been a part of it.

Sincerely,
Alexa Fox

The Doctoral Student SIG (DocSIG) is a special interest group of the American Marketing Association designed specifically for marketing doctoral students. DocSIG offers opportunities for students to develop professional skills and seeks to provide a supportive and friendly environment for students of marketing to interact. Alexa Fox is a Marketing Ph.D. Candidate at the University of Memphis. Her research interests include digital marketing, neuromarketing, online reviews, and online privacy.

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